Accuracy in Media

America’s education system has fallen to No. 22 in the world, but don’t worry – They’re from Teen Vogue, and they’re here to help.

Teen Vogue has graduated from articles promoting communism, Marxism, and countless Democratic Party talking points. And now they’re creating classroom content.

The magazine published an article headlined, “In Session: The Teen Vogue Lesson Plan,” which seeks to mend what it calls a “patchwork education system” that exists thanks to a lack of a national curriculum, which would make it easier to steamroll states objecting to specific material and teaching methods.

Without intervention from Teen Vogue, teachers would continue depriving their students of don’t miss topics such as “Tear Gas and Pepper Spray: What to Do If You’re Exposed” and “What Is Environmental Racism? 10 Facts About How It Works.”

There are several subjects that are likely already included in curricula – such as how a labor union works. But it’s not enough unless they teach it the Teen Vogue way. To succeed, teachers must appear to establish why someone might not want to join a union, but then call those people “free riders” and criticize them for “screwing over their unionized coworkers” by not indirectly contributing to political candidates whom they do not support.

What about capitalism? Under Teen Vogue’s curriculum, students would learn that people who support capitalism are “likely to dismiss anti-capitalists’ concerns about inequality,” and “[w]hen asked to consider capitalism’s negative impact on the environment and our shrinking natural resources, many say that those resources will only become more valuable and able to generate more capital as they continue to diminish.” Like capitalism? You’re greedy and don’t care about anything but yourself.

The lesson plan covers eight subjects, each with more than five lessons. Which existing lessons will teachers sacrifice to fit in a day of “Socialist Feminism: What Is It and How Can It Replace Corporate ‘Girl Boss’ Feminism” or “How to Talk to People Who Won’t Wear Face Masks“?

Teachers are not Teen Vogue’s typical audience. But Teen Vogue doesn’t need teachers to reach teenagers across the country – it’s already happening.

Most teenagers get their news from social media. Teen Vogue has 3.2 million followers on Twitter. “Six in 10 say they are more likely to get it from celebrities, influencers, and personalities rather than from news organizations utilizing the platform,” according to a poll from Common Sense Media.

That same poll shows “teens are more confident in the news they get directly from news organizations.”

Teen Vogue is the rare outlet that can straddle that line. They are huge on social media and have both the cachet that comes with being in the glow of celebrity. Add to that the authority to tell teen girls what is cool this season, and you get the intoxicating promise of being both smart and popular.

Unchecked, they have a dangerous amount of power.

Accuracy in Media has been watching Teen Vogue since the magazine’s content took a turn toward the overtly political. Last June, Teen Vogue was preaching communism and Marxism to its teenage readers. It has also previously denounced entrepreneurship and brought on Hillary Clinton as a guest editor, and extrapolated Matt Gaetz’s misdeeds to “many workplaces.”




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