Accuracy in Media

The recent media frenzy of Michael Wolff’s book, “Fire and Fury,” and his take on the inner White House workings has exposed some blatant biases.

Some of the claims in the book have proven to be false, such as when Wolff wrote that then-candidate Donald Trump did not know who former Speaker of the House John Boehner (R.-Ohio) was. Trump tweeted about Boehner in 2015, repudiating the book’s claims.

One New York Times reporter said that the overall message of White House chaos under the Trump administration is believable despite the information included in the book.

New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman, whom WikiLeaks exposed as being the reporter who would “tee up stories” for the Clinton campaign, is one of the reporters who has tried to toe the line on whether the book’s claims are true:

“I believe parts of it and then there are other parts that are factually wrong…”

“I can see several places in the book that are wrong. So for instance, he inaccurately describes a report in the New York Times. He inaccurately characterizes a couple of incidents that took place early on in the administration. He gets basic details wrong…

“He creates a narrative that is notionally true, conceptually true, the details are often wrong.”

On the other hand, CNN’s Alisyn Camerota criticized Wolff’s book and said, “this isn’t really journalism.”





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