Accuracy in Media

Former Pennsylvania governor Ed Rendell, who has been critical in the past of the Obama campaign’s attacks on Bain Capital, said Friday that he thinks the campaign may have gone a little bit too far with the “felony business.”

Rendell was referring to Obama deputy campaign manager Stephanie Cutter. She had suggested last week, following a Boston Globe article that questioned when Mitt Romney actually left Bain, that he may have committed a felony if he signed SEC forms indicating that he was still running Bain while he was telling the public that he wasn’t.

The Obama campaign seized on the Globe story as evidence that Romney is not telling the truth about his tenure at Bain and therefore can’t be trusted, while ignoring organizations like FactCheck.org which pointed out that the article contained information that had previously been written about in other publications and revealed nothing new.

Rendell appeared Friday on Alex Wagner’s show on MSNBC and said that while he thought going after Romney on the tax return issue was a good idea, he agreed with Wall Street Journal White House correspondent Carol Lee on the felony issue:

But on the other hand, I think Carol also made a very good point about all this attack may be hurting the President’s brand a little bit, too. I think our supporters went a little bit too far with the felony business.

The Obama campaign may want to take Rendell’s advice. By making the suggestion that Romney may have committed a crime, they take the campaign to a whole new level. And without incontrovertible proof, it makes the Obama campaign look like they will stop at nothing to try and win the election.

Obama campaigned in part on his ability to “heal America’s wounds at home.” But instead, with attacks like these on his opposition, he has only divided the country even more. And we still have three and a half more months to go before November.





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