Accuracy in Media

Conservative talkers are starting to disappear from the airwaves in California.

From the L.A. Times

Tune in to conservative talk radio in California, and the insults quickly fly. Capturing the angry mood of listeners the other day, a popular host in Los Angeles called Republican lawmakers who voted to raise state taxes “a bunch of weak slobs.”

With their trademark ferocity, radio stars who helped engineer Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger’s rise in the 2003 recall have turned on him over the new tax increases. On stations up and down the state, they are chattering away in hopes of igniting a taxpayers’ revolt to kill his budget measures on the May 19 ballot.

But for all the anti-tax swagger and the occasional stunts by personalities like KFI’s John and Ken, the reality is that conservative talk radio in California is on the wane. The economy’s downturn has depressed ad revenue at stations across the state, thinning the ranks of conservative broadcasters.

For that and other reasons, stations have dropped the shows of at least half a dozen radio personalities and scaled back others, in some cases replacing them with cheaper nationally syndicated programs.

Casualties include Mark Larson in San Diego, Larry Elder and John Ziegler in Los Angeles, Melanie Morgan in San Francisco, and Phil Cowen and Mark Williams in Sacramento.

Conservative talk radio is alive and well contrary to what Finnegan writes. When stations cut costs they aren’t doing it based on any political ideology but on economics.  Talk show hosts are very well paid and if advertising drops off as it has for radio, television and newspapers even popular hosts face the prospect of being fired and replaced with a lower cost format.  It’s interetsing to note that Finnegan didn’t mention liberal talk radio.  Oh, wait a minute that failed years ago.

 




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