Accuracy in Media

Radical
feminists have been hard at work for decades stressing the importance
of women choosing career paths over homemaking, corner offices instead
of kitchens, and power suits to replace aprons. To a certain extent,
their message has been accepted and assimilated into mainstream society.

The U.S. Department of Labor reported in 2007 that “A record 68 million
women were employed in the U.S.—75% of employed women worked on
full-time jobs, while 25% worked on a part-time basis” and “Women
accounted for 51% of all workers in the high-paying management,
professional, and related occupations.” Yet a new movement of women is
rising up with an age-old message countering the feminist focus on
careers before kids. Though they recognize a woman’s choice between the
corporation and kitchen, these women unapologetically choose
domesticity.

At the forefront of the fight against radical feminism, the Network of Enlightened Women (NeW) seeks to emphasize the value of motherhood in response to their
perception of its degraded worth per the feminist focus on careers. Karin Agness, founder of the 4-year-old organization, stated the following at their National Conference on June 27:

“In the 20th century, women have made great gains, but unfortunately
the feminists have taken it too far to one extreme. They’ve opened the
door to careers for many women, but relegated those women who choose
motherhood and family to second-class citizenship. Rather than giving
women a choice, they’ve made the choice for us…”

She continued,

“In NeW we are culturally conservative young women; we embrace our
femininity, we embrace modesty. We recognize that there are differences
between the sexes, and rather then measure a woman’s self worth solely
by her career and what she does outside the home, we recognize the
value of motherhood.”

Boasting speakers such as authors Danielle Crittenden and Dr. Christina Hoff Sommers,
NeW’s events focus on topical women’s issues, as the organization aims
to illuminate women’s choice of social roles and to eliminate cultural
expectations of success as built by the feminist movement. NeW was born
as a book club for conservative women in college, reading and
discussing books such as “Who Stole Feminism?” and “What Women Really
Want.” The club’s more controversial coverage began when members began
to challenge the ever-divisive Vagina Monologues,
performed across college campuses annually to raise awareness about
violence against women. Protesting the play as vulgar and
self-defeating, the conservative group’s clash with Eve Ensler’s
staunchly-feminist play gained the attention of liberal women’s groups
nationwide.

Today women are faced with a choice between career and family, feminism
and NeW. Where the new generation of rising women will find their
self-worth remains to be seen.




Ready to fight back against media bias?
Join us by donating to AIM today.

Comments

Comments are turned off for this article.