Accuracy in Media

WASHINGTON – There has been a lot of conversation as to when the border wall along our southern border first started. Many folks believe the controversial topic was only brought to light by then Republican candidate for president, Donald Trump during his 2015-2016 campaign.

Although this is one of many campaign promises, the real estate mogul didn’t craft this legislation himself. In fact to the surprise of many, legislation titled  “The Secure Fence Act of 2006” was signed into law on October 26, 2006.

George W. Bush was the pioneer in adding a physical barrier to enhance the security to the south end of our country. In “The Secure Fence Act of 2006,” the White House Press Secretary’s office put out the following statement:

“By making wise use of physical barriers and deploying 21st-century technology, we can help our Border Patrol Agents do their job and make our border more secure.” Even though the 109th Congress held a Republican majority until the 2006 mid-terms, this act received full bi-partisan support. In the House of Representatives by a vote of 283-138, it passed into the Senate, receiving 80-19 votes, passing onto the President’s desk.

The difference between Bush’s trailblazing immigration policy versus Trump’s continuous path on the same trail of safety and security is time. Specifically, a decade in between the two pieces of legislation.

Jimmy Carter, the 39th President of the U.S., told a New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd, “I think the media have been harder on Trump than any other president certainly that I’ve known about.”

President Carter, not a Republican nor a Trump supporter, claiming him and his wife voted for Bernie Sanders in the 2016 democratic primary, noticed how bias and difficult the news coverage has been on our current president. 

A 2019 Pew study also found that 73 percent of Republicans do not believe the mainstream media understand ‘people like them.’




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