Accuracy in Media


A new poll from the Washington Post and ABC News found that the percentage of Democrats who describe the situation at the U.S.-Mexico border as a  “crisis” has increased by 17 points since January as the nation’s southern border swells with increasing numbers of undocumented immigrants, even as many mainstream media figures and politicians denounce President Donald Trump’s declaration of a national emergency.

“More than a third of Americans say that illegal immigration at the U.S.-Mexico border is at a “crisis,” up 11 percentage points since January as Democrats have grown sharply more concerned about the issue, according to a Washington Post-ABC News poll,” report the Post’s Emily Guskin and David Nakamura. “The poll, conducted by cellular and landline telephone between April 22 and 25, finds that 35 percent of Americans believe the situation is a crisis, up from 24 percent in January. While that figure included a modest increase among Republicans and independents, the percentage of Democrats who agree jumped from 7 percent to 24 percent, nearly a quarter of the party.”

Trump has repeatedly sounded the alarm about the dangers for children and sexual violence that women face as they travel to the southern border seeking asylum.

“Having once accused the president of falsely fanning public fears over a nonexistent crisis, Democrats have shifted to emphasizing the humanitarian challenges at the border,” the Post’s poll coverage continues. “The shifting views have altered the political calculus for Democrats, including the 20 candidates already in the race for the party’s presidential nomination, who have sought to challenge Trump’s hard-line rhetoric on immigration.”

The Post also reported that “39 percent approve of Trump’s handling of immigration, up slightly from 35 percent in 2017. That includes 74 percent of Republicans, a sign that the president’s conservative base is sticking with him.”




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