Accuracy in Media

It looks and sounds like the Washington Post is pushing Critical Race Theory (CRT) propaganda and promoting white self-loathing.  The WaPo video publication “The Lily” is targeting white, millennial women with CRT under the wrapper of “The New Normal.”  The video poses the question, “Why is White racial identity important?”.

The first part of the video series tackled White Identity and concluded that white girls should never really stop apologizing for their “whiteness.”

“For the first time,” says Lily host, Nicole Ellis about the events of the last year, “white people were becoming aware of their whiteness and the systemic ways that white supremacy affects all of us.”

The problem, however, is that the Lily, along with other CRT proponents, conflate and confuse “whiteness” and “racism” interchangeably, to deliver the not-so-subtle message that being white, somehow, is racist.

“I was originally from a smaller town in Oklahoma,” says Kelsey Aria, a crisis interventionist.

“Whiteness was the default. Whiteness was the comfort. The more you kind of dive into that, the more I’m realizing how deeply rooted racism is, into my everyday thought process.”

And no matter how much she thinks about it, the more she realizes “there is still almost more work to be done.”

In any other context, excepting White Americans, one would label these ideas as a type of mental aberration known as Ethnic Self-Hatred.

It’s this Ethnic Self-Hatred that CRT—and the Lily—is trying to legitimize.

The Lily’s exploration of White identity posits that:

  • All White culture is racist
  • White’s need White accountability groups to point out their racism
  • White people have been taught the wrong things in school
  • White people need to relearn everything they were taught in school
  • The deep shame for being White is a legitimate part of being anti-racist
  • That shaming process can take up to five years

Kelsey Aria says that because she is White, she can’t see the racism –or whiteness- that comes between her and her relationships with others who are not white.

Host Nicole Ellis agreed, “I feel like for people of color, you are kind of constantly trying to gauge whether or not it’s worth it to be vulnerable or to share how someone hurt you when your white colleagues or co-workers or friends mess up.”

Because White people are always to blame for how others feel.

Some proponents of Critical Race Theory say that it’s being misrepresented by opponents, especially those who oppose it in schools.

“That’s garbage, it’s hogwash,” says Dr. Max Krochmal, a history professor at Texas Christian University. “They paint a picture of things that happen in schools that really just don’t happen. Nobody is being made feel guilty because of their racial identity. That is not part of a CRT lesson.”

Well, it may not be a part of Krochmal’s CRT lesson, but it’s certainly is a part of the Washington Post and the writers and editors at their women’s publication, The Lily.

For them, the central message of CRT is one of White guilt that never ends.  Buyer beware.




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