Accuracy in Media

Hollywood’s anti-Republican bias has been evident for a while now, from celebrities calling out Republican politicians and policies by name during awards shows to writers and producers weaving woke agendas into the plotlines of films and TV shows. In recent weeks, however, two major television networks have gone to even greater lengths to demonize Republicans, and they’ve made mockeries of themselves in the process. 

The hit NBC medical drama “New Amsterdam” recently depicted the Supreme Court’s overturning of Roe v. Wade as though it were a global catastrophe on par with 9/11 or nuclear war. In a two-minute-long opening scene, the show’s characters are shown reacting to the news in silent, awestruck horror, with people crying in the streets and slow-motion shots of coffee cups falling from hands. 

In an even more bizarre example, the series finale of “The Good Fight on Paramount+ has an entire storyline about a gay character who claims Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis sexually assaulted him by forcing him to have oral sex while he was an intern in the governor’s office. This character then goes on to admit to having made up the allegation, but it’s still an utterly bizarre plot point. 

TV networks like Paramount+ and NBC despise Republicans so much that they don’t care about alienating half of their viewership with partisan storylines like these. They value their agenda over their bottom lines. “The Good Fight” has been an anti-Trump show for years and it’s steadily fallen in the ratings. Now that both of these shows are in their final seasons and have little to lose, why not go for broke on the way out the door? 

Painting DeSantis as a sexual deviant and the overturning of Roe v. Wade as the end of abortion in America as we know it are comical, yes, but these storylines have s a more insidious effect. 

In the lead-up to the 2008 presidential election, Tina Fey portrayed candidate Sarah Palin on “Saturday Night Live” and uttered the now-infamous line, “I can see Russia from my house!” That caricature of Palin quickly morphed into a quasi-reality. The phrase became so ubiquitous that many Americans genuinely believed Palin had said it. Some still do. That’s not Tina Fey’s fault of course, but the left learned a valuable lesson from this phenomenon: Use entertainment to hyperbolize Republican agendas and hope viewers confuse fabrication with reality. 

How many people are now going to watch this episode of “The Good Fight” and think that Ron DeSantis is actually a sexual predator? How many people are going to watch “New Amsterdam” and believe that abortion is banned everywhere, when that’s not what overturning Roe actually did? Democrats capitalize on their cultural ability to blur the lines of fiction and reality in an effort to paint their opponents as villains and hope that innocent viewers believe it. 




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