Accuracy in Media

It was an honor to represent Accuracy In Media at the White House last week at the “Generation Next: A White House Forum” on how to help young people thrive in our economy, get a better return on their education, defeat opioid addiction and preserve campus free speech.

The forum featured conversations with President Trump, Ivanka Trump, Kellyanne Conway, Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar and a spokeswoman from the Department of Justice.

During the forum, Trump said he would give his younger self one piece of advice. The Hill summarized:

“Don’t run for president,” Trump quipped when asked at a youth forum what advice he would have told his 25-year-old self.

Trump said he was much more widely loved during his career as a businessman and reality TV star.

“I got the greatest publicity. I was getting such great — until I ran for office,” he said.

At the same time, he said the level of support as president is higher than the 40 percent he gets in job-approval polls.

“People really do get it, there is a lot of fake news out there,” he said. “Nobody had any idea. I’m actually proud of the fact I exposed it to a large extent. It’s an achievement.”

In the room, I applauded the president for pointing out his courage to expose bias in the mainstream media. Later, I was glad to highlight the White House Forum on MSNBC, and I contrasted this focus on policy and substance with the innuendo and gossip surrounding this presidency.

As we report at Accuracy In Media, the responsibility of journalists in the mainstream media is to find the signal amidst the noise. If journalists are upset with the Trump presidency, why don’t they raise the national discourse and focus on policy and substance? Why don’t they return to the roots of what America’s creation was for: to form a more perfect union?





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