Accuracy in Media

On Monday, the blue checks of the mainstream media were asking why so little coverage of a president being “credibly accused” of rape.

The New York Times wrote that it is a pattern of President Donald Trump’s to deny accusations of unwanted advances made by women by saying they are not his type, Salon divined the wisdom on men, love and life from past E. Jean Carroll’s columns, and Jill Filipovic of NBC News wrote that her accusations “were met with shrugs because they’re so shockingly normal.”

“The president of the United States was credibly accused of sexual assault (again) on Friday. In any other universe, this would be a massive and likely career-ending scandal. In this disgraceful White House, it wasn’t even enough of a story to crack the front pages of major newspapers,” Filipovic wrote.

Carroll, an advice columnist for Elle magazine, went on Anderson Cooper 360 to talk about her allegation that Trump cornered her in the dressing room of an exclusive department store and raped her.

By the time the 9-minute segment ended, Carroll had said Trump had asked her to help him find a present for another woman, then suggested they look in lingerie. Then, for some reason, the lingerie section of the store was abandoned, a dressing room was left unlocked even though they are always locked, and Trump had cornered her inside it.

She told a story of trying to get Trump to try on lingerie, then being cornered in the room, then Trump banging her head against the wall and kissing her.

“I started laughing again,” she said.

“You started laughing?” Cooper replied.

“Of course.”

“Why of course?” Cooper asked. “Because if it was a way of … if it was at all erotic … if a man was laughed at, it usually will make him …”

Cooper asked if Trump said anything.

“He was like ‘we’re going to do this. We’re just so hot for each other.’”

She said the president then pulled down her tights with one hand.

“That’s when it turned serious. I realized this was a fight.”

She later said she was “too panicked to be scared.” Later, she said, “Then, down go the tights. And it hurt. And it was against my will.”

Cooper said this is the definition of rape.

Carroll said since it didn’t last long, she doesn’t use “the word you just used. I use the word ‘fight.’”

“Sexual violence is in every country in every strata of society, and I just feel that so many women are undergoing sexual violence. Mine was short. I got out. I’m happy now. I’m moving on. And I think of all the women who are enduring constant sexual violence. So this one instance, this one three minutes in this little dressing room. I just say it’s the fight. That way I’m not the victim.”

Cooper asked, “You do not feel like the victim?”

Carroll responded: “I was not thrown on the ground and ravished. The word rape carries so many sexual connotations. This was not … this was not sexual. It was just … it hurt. It just … you know …

“I think most people think of rape as a … violent assault. It is not?” Cooper stammered.

“I think most people think of rape as being sexy,” Carroll said.

“Let’s take a short break,” Cooper said, clearly flustered.

“Think of the fantasies,” Carroll says.

“We’re just going to take a short break,” Cooper said. “If you could stick around, we’ll talk more.”

“You’re fascinating to talk to,” Carroll said. Cooper laughed uncomfortably.




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