Accuracy in Media

Imagine if a major conservative media outlet had compared former President Obama to a pig. The outrage in the national media would reverberate for days on end. After all, the Oval Office deserves respect, even if you disagree with its occupant on policy.

But The New York Times continues to disrespect President Trump in its editorial, “The Wrong People Are Criticizing Donald Trump,” praising former FBI Director Jim Comey and Deputy Director Andrew McCabe for attacking the president: “Meanwhile, Mr. Comey, Mr. McCabe and the others who face Mr. Trump’s taunts and provocations should remember the old warning about wrestling a pig. You only get covered in mud — and, besides, the pig likes it.”

In its editorial, The Times also ignores the Constitutional right to due process by Trump as well as the growing evidence of bias within the clandestine services against the Trump campaign during the 2016 election. It also fails to mention that McCabe was fired by recommendation of the FBI’s Office of Professional Responsibility because he allegedly “made an unauthorized disclosure to the news media and lacked candor — including under oath — on multiple conclusions.” The Times also doesn’t mention that the OPR’s director was appointed by investigator Bob Mueller in 2004, when Mueller headed the FBI.

Instead of acknowledging the anti-Trump bias of John Brennan, Obama’s CIA director, for insulting Trump via Twitter (Brennan said: “When the full extent of your venality, moral turpitude, and political corruption becomes known, you will take your rightful place as a disgraced demagogue in the dustbin of history.”), the Times instead says the insult is “gratifying to read.”

The Times faults Republicans for not piling on against Trump, despite evidence that the FBI would not have sought a FISA court surveillance warrant to spy on at least one member of the Trump campaign without relying on a spurious dossier funded by Democrats.

 





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