Accuracy in Media

A lot of strange press phraseology has departed now that Donald Trump isn’t president. 

Case in point is the warmed-over rehash of Russian collusion allegations made by the New York Times recently as the Biden administration imposed sanctions on more Ukrainian millionaires last week. 

A few phrases that previously loomed large in the New York Times have disappeared with new revelations by Biden’s Treasury team on Russia and Trump doing something together, about which the NYT isn’t very clear.   

Gone from the NYT’s reporting are the phrases “without evidence,” “baseless,” and “bizarre conspiracy” — at least at it applies to any stories about Biden. 

Last week in an article headlined,Biden Administration Says Russian Intelligence Obtained Trump Campaign Data,” the Times reported that the “Biden administration revealed on Thursday that a business associate of Trump campaign officials in 2016 provided campaign polling data to Russian intelligence services, the strongest evidence to date that Russian spies had penetrated the inner workings of the Trump campaign.” 

Yet just four paragraphs later, the New York Times writes, “The Biden administration provided no supporting evidence to bolster the assessment that the Russian intelligence services obtained the polling data and campaign information.” 

A cursory search on the internet would show you that previously, some of these phrases like “baseless” were stand-ins by the New York Times for claims made by Trump that, like the Biden claims here, had “no supporting evidence”—at least as determined by the Times, and at least as it related to Trump.  

The NYT used such phrases to try to discredit the Trump claim that the United States government spied on his campaign in 2016 (Without Evidence, Trump Claims Vindication From Release of Carter Page Documents); the claim that there was widespread voter fraud in the 2020 election even before the claims had been investigated (Trump’s False Election Fraud Claims Split Republicans) practically before the counting had been finished (TV Anchors and Pundits Criticize Trump’s Baseless Claims of Fraud); and even tweeted against an early vaccine approval claimed by Trump saying:  “President Trump defended his administration’s record on the coronavirus by claiming, without evidence [editor’s emphasis], that a vaccine would be available far sooner than experts say it will be.” 

The Times went on to explain that a COVID vaccine may not be available until the summer of 2021, according to experts. 

The NYT used the story regarding the imposition of new sanctions by the Biden administration on Konstantin Kilimnik, Ukrainian political consultant now in residence in Moscow, as a way to re-hash the now-discredited Russian collusion investigation, another story in which the Times failed to use “without evidence;” “baseless” and “bizarre conspiracy” theory. 

The New York Times doesn’t say why the Biden administration chose to impose new sanctions. 




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