Accuracy in Media


Andrew McCabe is in big trouble. He has admitted to starting an investigation against President Trump in retaliation for Trump firing FBI director James Comey.

He was fired by the FBI for lying on numerous occasions and has been referred by Congress for prosecution for perjury and other crimes and likely will face charges in the near future.

But before he goes, he has written a book and gone on numerous network shows to promote it, and news anchors have been asking softball questions that enable him to tell his side of the story without exploring what could be serious crimes.

Natasha Bertrand of the Atlantic served up one such interview in “Andrew McCabe Couldn’t Believe the Things Trump Said About Putin,” — subhead, “The former deputy director of the FBI explains why the bureau felt obligated to investigate the president – and how the Mueller probe might end.”

Bertrand repeated without question McCabe’s assertion that “concerns about Trump had been building ‘for some time’ – and that [McCabe] was convinced the FBI would have been justified in opening a case against the president.”

The book, “The Threat: How the FBI Protects America in the Age of Terror and Trump,” is “not generally overstated in its approach to Trump,” Bertrand writes.

“This reflects either an aversion to exaggeration on McCabe’s part – his self-image, it seems, is that of a just-the-facts-ma’am G-man – or an awareness that the Justice Department’s inspector general has, for all intents and purposes, branded him a fabulist, a charge he finds particularly wounding.”

Bertrand seems unaware McCabe was fired for not being a just-the-facts-ma’am G-man but because he did not tell the truth on multiple documented occasions.

NBC also gave McCabe a microphone with a friendly interview on Today. McCabe told Savannah Guthrie he briefed congressional leaders about the investigation he opened against the president and “no one objected.

“That’s the important part here. No one objected. Not on legal grounds, not on constitutional grounds and not based on the facts.”

“I can’t tell you how horrific it’s been to have to endure the threats, the taunts, the bullying of the president of the United States in such a public way,” McCabe said on the show. “I try not to take it personally, but it’s very hard. It’s been incredibly tough on my family.”

Chris Cillizza of CNN offered a personalized defense of McCabe in “Here’s the worst thing Donald Trump said to Andrew McCabe.”

The worst thing wasn’t Trump responding to McCabe authorizing a revenge investigation against him or criticizing him for leaking details of the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s private email server or “even whether he is exaggerating in order to boost sales for his memoir of his time in the Trump administration.”

No, the worst thing was Trump attacking McCabe because he cleared Hillary after Democrat fixer and former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe gave nearly $700,000 to McCabe’s wife’s campaign for the Virginia State Senate.

“Here’s something on which no one should disagree: Donald Trump’s bullying of McCabe’s wife, Jill, is unseemly, unpresidential and just awful,” Cillizza wrote.

Cillizza wrote that “those two facts” – that McCabe’s wife ran as a Democrat and that McAuliffe gave her most of her campaign war chest “stuck in Trump’s craw, particularly after it became clear that Andrew McCabe wasn’t going to be an ally in hi war against the alleged ‘deep state’ within the Justice Department.”

Trump tweeted Tuesday that “I never said anything bad about Andrew McCabe’s wife other than she (they) should not have taken large amounts of campaign money from a Crooked Hillary source when Clinton was under investigation by the FBI. I never called his wife a loser to him (another McCabe made-up lie)!

Cillizza relays this and says, “Which, maybe! But if past is prologue – and it is – Trump absolutely called Jill McCabe a ‘loser.’ Why would McCabe lie at this point?”

 




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