Accuracy in Media


Mashable, a news company that reaches millions of people each month, excused calls for civility in public discourse as merely an example of how “Pundits more interested in decency and decorum often view the endgame of protest as satisfying skeptical white moderates.”

Mashable writer Rebecca Ruiz offered no conservative voices to counteract her analysis of protests around policies from the Trump administration, including its immigration policies. She also didn’t mention, for example, that even in the wake of the protests around the administration’s border enforcement, support among American Latinos rose by 10 percent, according to Harvard polling.

“Meanwhile, those who turn to confrontational protest may see it as a signal to the rest of America that Trump’s racist rhetoric and policies are not normal or acceptable,” Ruiz instructed. “It can be a rallying cry or an act of solidarity, regardless of whether it happens between two people in a restaurant or bookstore, or on the streets with thousands of people chanting the same message of resistance.”

Despite record low unemployment among African-Americans, among whom president Trump’s approval is rising, Ruiz attempted to co-opt Martin Luther King Jr., as endorsing her approach to protesting, despite the fact that King’s ancestors have both supported and opposed Trump’s work. That doesn’t stop Ruiz from projecting her worldview onto King’s.

“Yet what goes unsaid when we obsess over how white moderates will react to uncomfortable yet nonviolent displays of protest is that one man’s electoral strategy can be another man’s oppression. There’s a reason Martin Luther King Jr. singled out the white moderate for criticism in his Letter from Birmingham Jail, written in 1963,” she writes. “But if you’re faced with an unexpected moment to hold someone powerful accountable, I hope its King’s voice you hear in your head, and not a pundit’s who has nothing to lose.”

 




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