Accuracy in Media

A former staffer to New Hampshire Sen. Maggie Hassan (D) was sentenced to two years’ probation and other conditions due to her role in stealing and posting personal information of sitting Republican senators during the Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Brett Kavanaugh. The former staffer, Samantha Deforest Davis, was sentenced to 200 hours of community service and a suspended sentence of 180 days in prison due to her involvement in this example of “doxxing” U.S. senators.

“Doxxing,” or posting someone’s personal information online for all to see without that person’s express permission, is a tactic used to intimidate lawmakers, activists, and citizens of any background. It is considered to be a serious offense and also a possible safety threat.

Davis allegedly helped her ex-boyfriend, Jackson Cosko, to illegally obtain Republican senators’ personal information after Cosko was allegedly upset over their support for Kavanaugh. Davis lent her office keys to Cosko, which is illegal as Cosko was working for Democratic congresswoman Rep. Sheila Jackson-Lee (Texas) and should not have access to sensitive information belonging to the Senate.

This news was barely covered by the mainstream media, which conduct called into question of whether the media cared for the safety and well-being of the affected Republican senators. The Daily Wire and other right-leaning outlets and networks covered Davis’s sentencing, but the only mainstream media outlet to publish an article on Davis’s sentencing was National Public Radio.

Considering Cosko exposed multiple sitting Republican senators’ personal information, one could suggest that it should have been reported on by the mainstream media. But the media’s overall silence on the sentencing spoke volumes of where the media’s priorities lie: the impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump, and not news articles pertaining to the safety of U.S. senators.




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