Accuracy in Media


Alisyn Camerota seemed like a broken woman last Friday on CNN.

She began a panel discussion on House Democrats’ attempts to compel Donald McGahn, the former White House lawyer who spoke for more than 30 hours with special counsel Robert Mueller about President Trump, to testify before Congress.

She asked whether McGahn’s testimony “would change anything” and said there is “ample evidence” in the Mueller report that Trump obstructed justice. Mueller did not think so and did not charge Trump with obstruction.

Her co-anchor, John Berman, said the president told McGahn to fire Mueller and create a fake paper trail.

“Absolutely,” Camerota said back. “That sounds like obstruction of justice, and they won’t do anything about it.”

Then she launched into a tirade at the whole situation.

“I guess my point, John, and I’m sorry if I sound like they’ve broken my spirit,” she said. “I think I am channeling many members of the American public who feel these past two years have been disheartening for people who believe in justice. The reason that I say that is because, you see in the Mueller report ample evidence laid out of obstruction, of what Robert Mueller considered obstruction, but nothing happens. You see violations of the emoluments clause but nothing happens. You see nepotism, but nothing happens.

“At this point, I think there is a feeling of, I don’t know, exhaustion I guess. We know this from polls. We know this from voters turning away after the Mueller report that they think that Congress is going to continue this and there’ll be more legalese and there’ll be more nuance. I’m just not sure to what end.”

Jeff Zucker, the head of CNN, said he hired Camerota away from Fox News because “I knew she wasn’t getting dragged into ideological morass, and so I knew she was a real journalist.”

But this “real journalist” has a long history now of expressing her views in what is supposed to be a position of anchoring a news program, not an opinion show.

Last December, she went off on Trump’s “ill-conceived policy of family separations.”

The previous month, she attempted to compare the sexual harassment of which former Fox News president Roger Ailes was accused with Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh and President Trump.

“Roger casts a long shadow,” she said in an interview with Hollywood Reporter. “I hear her it in Donald Trump. I heard it in Brett Kavanaugh.”

When she heard Kavanaugh talk about drinking beer in high school, it struck a note. “I thought, ‘Oh, my gosh. I know that. I know that slogan. I know that syncopation of a sentence, that something is so easy. After a while, you can channel Roger. It’s just … boil it down to its most simplistic, gut-level satisfaction.”

She was a leader in pushing the anti-gun narrative after the Parkland school shootings. She said nothing when David Hogg, the student leader of the anti-gun movement, called the NRA “child murderers.”

Later in the week, when Dana Loesch, a spokeswoman for the NRA, challenged Camerota on it, she claimed she had never said it and instead took Loesch to task for her remarks earlier that news networks such as CNN “loved mass shootings” because of the ratings boost.

“You’re wrong on every level,” Camerota said to Loesch. “…You just made a malicious statement and I have to respond. Guess what? They’re not ratings gold. Americans have reached saturation level. They’re so sock of it and it’s so heartbreaking that they actually often turn away and we still have the conversation trying to find solutions.”

 




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