Accuracy in Media

Have you noticed that many news organizations, in honor of former ABC News anchorman Peter Jennings, have embarked on a quit smoking campaign? So why don’t our media launch a campaign advising people to quit engaging in the dangerous and addictive homosexual lifestyle? Life-threatening sexually transmitted diseases among homosexuals are on the increase. 

Jennings was a smoker who died of lung cancer. But CBS News icon Edward R. Murrow is shown in the George Clooney film about Joe McCarthy lighting up like a Christmas tree. What’s more, the anti-smoking message hasn’t filtered down into Hollywood, either.

A study of smoking in movies has been released by Dr. James Sargent, a professor of pediatrics at Dartmouth Medical School, who says that ten percent of U.S. teens try smoking cigarettes between the ages of 10 and 14. Of that ten percent, nearly 40 percent of them say they did so because they saw people smoking in movies. Utah Attorney General Mark Shurtleff has called on Hollywood to curb images of smoking in movies. Shurtleff and 31 other state attorneys general have asked Hollywood to put anti-smoking public service announcements in all DVDs that depict smoking.

Over at ABC World News Tonight, which was hosted by Jennings, correspondent Bob Woodruff did a controversial report on November 17 wondering if smokeless tobacco was a good alternative to smoking.

Surgeon General Admiral Richard Carmona told ABC that he could not endorse any smokeless tobacco because it contains carcinogens and can cause oral cancers and nicotine addiction. Carmona said, “So I couldn’t possibly recommend that because I’d really be asking you to substitute one form of carcinogen for another form of carcinogen.”

The Woodruff report was part of a November ABC News series of stories entitled “Quit to Live: Fighting Lung Cancer.”

That’s performing a good public service. But let’s take this humanitarian impulse one step further. We would suggest that ABC News take on another dangerous practice?homosexuality. The latest reports indicate a rising pattern of sexually transmitted diseases nationwide. The 2005 estimate for syphilis cases is the highest in a decade, and the number of gonorrhea cases will exceed any other year’s count since 1993. Federal officials attribute the increases mostly to HIV-positive homosexual men having sex with one another. The practice is called “serosorting.”

The practice shows the dangerous and addictive nature of the homosexual lifestyle. As if it wasn’t bad enough that the homosexual men are HIV-positive, they simply cannot stop having sex with other men. So they are still having sex, this time with other HIV-positive men. They think this is “responsible” sex. But they are increasing their risk of acquiring other sexually transmitted infections, including new resistant strains of HIV.

It appears that the homosexual lifestyle is as addictive as smoking.

Not only will the media not highlight this fact, reporters shy away from the facts concerning the great disparities in federal funding favoring AIDS over other diseases. The FAIR Foundation points out, “The lion’s share of the federal research budget is spent on AIDS?a disease that is killing a fraction of Americans each year when compared with diseases like diabetes and Alzheimer’s. Even the flu kills twice as many people as AIDS.”



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