From The National Journal:

Members of the House’s Select Committee on Benghazi will meet this week with family members of the four Americans who were killed at the Libyan embassy two years ago, members of the committee told National Journal.

The meeting will be the first between members of the select committee, which was formed in May, and victims’ families. The families have appeared before Congress in the past, having testified before the House Oversight Committee just a year after the initial attacks.

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From Fox News:

Members of the Islamist extremist militia blamed for the Benghazi terror attack had moved in next door to the U.S. Consulate months before the strike but “nothing was done” despite concerns about the dangerous neighbors, sources tell Fox News.

Sources say members of Ansar al-Sharia moved to the house just outside the east wall of the compound within three weeks of American personnel renting the facility, and later used the location to help plan and take part in the attack on the American Consulate on Sept. 11, 2012.

The neighbors prompted multiple security requests — including repeated requests up until the day of the attack — for more weapons and personnel.

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From The Washington Times:

The Obama administration’s just-released criminal complaint against the alleged mastermind of the Benghazi terrorist attacks provides a final contradiction to its own evolving explanations for what happened that day.

The Justice Department’s indictment spells out a calculated conspiracy by Ahmed Abu Khatallah and associates to attack the U.S. diplomatic mission and CIA annex, which killed four Americans. The indictment might be viewed as a death knell for a theory that the attack resulted from a spontaneous protest against a U.S.-produced video.

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From USA Today:

WASHINGTON — Two months after the House of Representatives chartered a new committee to investigate the 2012 Benghazi attacks, the panel will begin getting down to work in July, Chairman Trey Gowdy said, but it will not be in a hurry to make headlines.

“We live in a society and a culture that likes to move pretty quickly, so I’m sure that there are some out there whose expectations for speed are not matching the reality,” The South Carolina Republican told USA TODAY in an interview, “It is tough to get a committee from not existing to up to running at the legal speed limit.”

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